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Anti-steroids campaign: A victory because of Barry Bonds

Barry Bonds Barry Bonds came out on the losing end of the "Steroid Trial of the Century" on Wednesday when a federal jury convicted the "home run king" of obstruction of justice. The down-and-dirty details that emerged during the trial made for salacious headlines, notably his lack of sexual prowess. The trial may have been so humiliating, in fact, that it might be enough to dissuade athletes from using steroids. Here’s what the editorial board had to say when weighing in at the start of the trial:

[I]t's hard to imagine how any pro athlete, or any high school kid aspiring to be one, could look at Bonds' public disgrace and decide that taking steroids would be a good idea. Cheating doesn't just shrink sexual organs; it ravages reputations.

RELATED:

Bond's last big at-bat

-- Alexandra Le Tellier

Photo: Former San Francisco Giants star Barry Bonds arrives at the Phillip Burton Federal Building for his perjury trial as jurors resume deliberation in San Francisco on April 11, 2011. Credit: Stephen Lam / Reuters

 

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honolulu56

Another victory for the white race. After the disaster of 1994 excitement was needed so people would not blow off MLB. Mark McGwire, Sammy Sosa, were the home run kings, remember, Mc GcGuire testified in front of Congress and perjured himself, that he didn't "juice" Year after year, even after retirement, the press and law enforcement have hounded Barry for doing (maybe) the same thing. McGwire goes to the hall of fame, and Bonds may go to jail for (maybe ) doing the same thing, winning at all costs. Barry's unpardonable sin is he is Black, and thats's all there is to it. McGwire sobbed like a baby whining he didn't want to "bring up the past", as most criminals who are caught don't want to either. Before you crucify Barry, for honesty's sake include the fact he was acquitted of all the other real charges except obstruction, and that was only because someone else lied to avoid the law. Barry Bonds is the HOME RUN KING, even if he's black. And my hero, crippled little white boy I am

honolulu56

Another victory for the white race. After the disaster of 1994 excitement was needed so people would not blow off MLB. Mark McGwire, Sammy Sosa, were the home run kings, remember, Mc GcGuire testified in front of Congress and perjured himself, that he didn't "juice" Year after year, even after retirement, the press and law enforcement have hounded Barry for doing (maybe) the same thing. McGwire goes to the hall of fame, and Bonds may go to jail for (maybe ) doing the same thing, winning at all costs. Barry's unpardonable sin is he is Black, and thats's all there is to it. McGwire sobbed like a baby whining he didn't want to "bring up the past", as most criminals who are caught don't want to either. Before you crucify Barry, for honesty's sake include the fact he was acquitted of all the other real charges except obstruction, and that was only because someone else lied to avoid the law. Barry Bonds is the HOME RUN KING, even if he's black. And my hero, crippled little white boy I am

Pete

Honolulu56, you might be right that there's an element of racism to how society views Barry Bonds, but you build a poor case in arguing that he was prosecuted because he is black, while white ballplayers have been given a pass. (1) In his testimony before Congress, Mark McGwire didn't deny using steroids. He refused to answer the questions, saying he was "not here to talk about the past." (2) McGwire is not in the Hall of Fame. (3) Barry Bonds was convicted of obstruction because the jurors found he was evasive in answering questions put to him in his grand jury testimony. It had nothing to do with what anyone else said. (4) Roger Clemens has been indicted for allegedly committing perjury when he testified before Congress that he has never used steroids. Clemens is white.


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