Opinion L.A.

Observations and provocations
from The Times' Opinion staff

« Previous Post | Opinion L.A. Home | Next Post »

Politics: Why Mitch Daniels may join the Republican presidential race, even if he doesn't actually want the job

Mitch Daniels

If you're a Mitch Daniels fan, or curious when the race for the Republican presidential nomination will get underway in earnest, here are some things the Indiana governor told me that didn’t make it into Thursday's column, "Debt and a tough-talking governor":

He says he's getting lots of encouragement to run from potential supporters and contributors -- especially since his cold-shower speech to last week's Conservative Political Action Conference.

"There are a lot of people, for reasons best known to themselves, who have approached me and told me I ought to run. There have been a lot more since that speech," he said.

He still says he hasn't decided whether to run, but he sounds considerably more interested now than he did a year ago, when he told reporters there were "a hundred reasons not to."

And he promises he’ll make a decision by May.

"You can't wait forever," he said. "If you make no decision by then, no decision means no."

That goes for the rest of the GOP pack too. The only possible exception, political strategists say, is former Alaska Gov. Sarah Palin, whose star power and fundraising ability might allow her to procrastinate a few months longer.

So by mid-May, three short months from now, we should know whether the Republican field will also include Daniels, former Arkansas Gov. Mike Huckabee, former House Speaker Newt Gingrich, Mississippi Gov. Haley Barbour, former Utah Gov. Jon Huntsman, former Sen. Rick Santorum of Pennsylvania, Sen. John Thune of South Dakota and Rep. Michele Bachmann of Minnesota -- to name only the most frequently mentioned possibilities. Judging by their actions, former Massachusetts Gov. Mitt Romney and former Minnesota Gov. Tim Pawlenty are already running.

It's also worth remembering -- as one GOP strategist reminded me this week -- that politicians sometimes run for president even if they don't expect to win. "It's a good way to get people to listen to your argument," he said. "And in Mitch's case, it might increase his chances of being picked for vice president."

RELATED:

And the GOP front-runner is ...

--Doyle McManus

Photo: Indiana Gov. Mitch Daniels speaks at the Conservative Political Action Conference dinner in Washington last week. Credit: Jonathan Ernst / Reuters

 

Comments () | Archives (6)

The comments to this entry are closed.

Tennisman

Mitch Daniels is EXACTLY what the doctor ordered for this time in American history. A serious man with serious ideas and the courage to offer them in the public square.

I hope he decides to seek the nomination. This business about the social issues is a red-herring.

Daniels is firmly in the camp of social conservatives. He always has been.

He is about to sign into law the most far-reaching education reform in American history, including a very expansive 'choice' plan that would allow low and moderate income families (family of 4 making less than $82K), a very pro-family initiative.

Soon he will sign an illegal immigration reform bill, and a bill banning 'gay marriage' in the state.

I hope he runs.

Martin Calhoun

The article last suggested that Daniels might be picked as vice president... that's possible, but it seems that it would make whoever won the number one seat look pretty weak... & then almost wish we voted for somebody else for president.

Martin Calhoun

The article last suggested that Daniels might be picked as vice president... that's possible, but it seems that it would make whoever won the number one seat look pretty weak... & then almost wish we voted for somebody else for president.

Martin Calhoun

The article last suggested that Daniels might be picked as vice president... that's possible, but it seems that it would make whoever won the number one seat look pretty weak... & then almost wish we voted for somebody else for president.

Greg Maragos

The success or failure of Mitch Daniels' presidential campaign, if he decides to run, will not be so much a reflection of the merits of his proposed solutions for balancing the federal government's budget (we know Daniels has the goods) as it will be an indication of how serious the American public is in dealing with the problem of an overwhelming national debt of $14 trillion, which, to many people, is still an abstraction.

geoffey n lachner

Daniels' only continues the age-old attacks on the most vulnerable of Americans. Not willing to look at current deficits run up by "defense," Wall St. scamming and greed, and tax breaks for the rich, (greed) he attacks Social Security's "future defcit." What a joke, and a diversion from the rich who obviously fund Mr. Daniesls. We need no more help for the rich.


Connect

Advertisement

In Case You Missed It...

Video


Categories


Recent Posts
Reading Supreme Court tea leaves on 'Obamacare' |  March 27, 2012, 5:47 pm »
Candidates go PG-13 on the press |  March 27, 2012, 5:45 am »
Santorum's faulty premise on healthcare reform |  March 26, 2012, 5:20 pm »

Archives
 


About the Bloggers
The Opinion L.A. blog is the work of Los Angeles Times Editorial Board membersNicholas Goldberg, Robert Greene, Carla Hall, Jon Healey, Sandra Hernandez, Karin Klein, Michael McGough, Jim Newton and Dan Turner. Columnists Patt Morrison and Doyle McManus also write for the blog, as do Letters editor Paul Thornton, copy chief Paul Whitefield and senior web producer Alexandra Le Tellier.



In Case You Missed It...